Predicting catastrophic failures

Rymic Systems has rolled out rymicNET, a stand-alone input and output interface device that allows maintenance personnel to predict catastrophic failures in vehicles and industrial equipment through the Internet.

Rymic Systems, quoted as an aggressive newcomer in the Internet Device market, has rolled out rymicNET, a stand-alone input and output interface device that allows maintenance personnel to predict catastrophic failures in vehicles and industrial equipment through the Internet.

Designed as an in-vehicle or equipment-attached device, rymicNET is said to monitor various performance data such as pressure, temperature, voltages and volumes and makes it available remotely via an Ethernet or serial connection to the Internet. A wireless version is planned that will support both BlueTooth and 802.11b Wireless Ethernet.

‘For organisations with fleets of vehicles and industrial equipment in multiple, disparate locations, rymicNET enables them to centrally monitor the performance and collect valuable data for predicting failures,’ said Steve May, president of Rymic Systems.

‘When a vehicle comes back from the field and rymicNET is connected to the Internet, the data is analysed by remote personnel and compared against known parameters so that the appropriate maintenance can be performed before trouble occurs.’ The first in a family of planned Internet devices, the rymicNET Model 2000 includes a NETSilicon Internet processor running Red Hat uClinux or a selectable RTOS, including Thread-X or VxWorks. It is supplied with 8 MB of Flash memory and 32 MB of SDRAM.

Communications capabilities include 10/100 Ethernet, RJ11 Internet connection, RS-232, four IEEE 1284 parallel ports and it’s USB 1.1 capable and PCI and PCCard expandable.

Year 2002 forecasts for installed Internet appliances ranging from 37 million by Jupiter Communications to over 150 million by International Data Corporation.

‘We believe a key segment of the market for high-end embedded Internet devices will be ground and air-based vehicles (including military, truck fleets, and construction equipment at remote sites) as well as complex industrial machinery,’ stated May.

‘Predictive failure analysis via the Internet is something that can save organisations a considerable amount of time and money by knowing when to repair the device before a catastrophic failure occurs.’

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