Giving anti-personnel mines the boot

A company in Hong Kong has created a boot that gives its wearers a fighting chance against serious injury from anti-personnel mines.

BfR Holdings Ltd, a company based in Hong Kong, has created a boot that gives its wearers a fighting chance against serious injury from anti-personnel mines.

BfR’s Chairman and CEO, FK Lee, says that his company’s boot, the BfR Blast and Fragment Resistant Combat Boot, can provide substantial protection against high velocity fragments, debris and hot gas streams created during blasts from particular common types of anti-personnel landmines at certain explosive charges.

The boots have been designed with a protective sole system, which provide deflection capabilities.

Developed with patented technologies the sole system is based on specially woven fabric bonded together with specially constructed sole and heel plates and heel plug. This is said to give the BfR combat boot its underlying strength.

The specially woven fabric can provide a significant degree of protection against blast temperatures generated by certain common types of anti-personnel landmines.

The boot also has a hydrolysis resistant polyurethane footbed insole, lightweight dual density direct rubber soling and a thermo-plastic protective toecap.

The boots were tested at the UK’s Royal Military College of Science against common types of anti-personnel landmine of different explosive charge sizes.

The tests were conducted under conditions that BfR believed to be two of the most likely scenarios for treading on a mine: firstly, stepping on an anti-personnel landmine at the heel and secondly, at the ball of the foot.

Test results are said to have shown that the boots can provide substantial protection against anti-personnel landmines.

These tests were not uniformly successful against all anti-personnel landmine types tested, but they did show that the boots can provide substantial protection against shrapnel, debris and hot gas streams caused by blasts from particular types of anti-personnel landmines.

Mr Lee said that even where substantial protection is provided, injury will occur but may be mitigated so that the wearer may still suffer broken bones and other collateral damage although the integrity of the limb might be maintained.

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