Report highlights improved emission control

A report from the European Commission shows that CO2 emissions from new passenger cars have fallen by about 10% since 1995.

A report from the European Commission shows that average CO2 emissions from new passenger cars have fallen by about 10% since 1995.

The report is based on the European Commission’s strategy of achieving emission levels of 120g CO2/km in new passenger cars by 2005, or by 2010 at the latest.

The report concludes that the strategy has so far resulted in a 10% reduction of CO2 emissions from new passenger cars sold on the EU market since 1995.

The main element of the strategy is the commitment from the European, Japanese and Korean car industries to reduce CO2 emissions from new passenger cars. While welcoming the result, the Commission stresses that additional efforts are necessary to meet the final target.

Commenting on the new report, Environment Commissioner Margot Wallström said: ‘Our agreements with the car manufacturers are showing results. They make an important contribution to our overall efforts to combat climate change. We will start discussions with the industry next year on how to further reduce emissions from passenger cars. The growth in CO2 emissions from transport remains one of the big challenges for our climate objectives.’

This third report on the implementation of the strategy shows that in the last year all associations reduced the average specific CO2 emissions of their cars sold on the EU market. The European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA) reduced emissions by about 2.5%, the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA) by about 2.2% and the Korea Automobile Manufacturers Association (KAMA) by about 2.6%. The fuel efficiency improvements for diesel passenger cars are said to be significantly better, compared to those for gasoline vehicles.

The report also found that in the reporting period 2000 ACEA achieved the intermediate target range of 170g/km envisaged for 2003. If JAMA can, on average, maintain the reduction rate achieved in 2001 it would meet at least the 2003 intermediate target of 175g/km.

The report notes that KAMA’s progress is unsatisfactory, although in 2001 it achieved the highest reduction rate so far. There is a real risk that KAMA will not meet its 2004 intermediate target range of 170g/km, but the Commission expects that KAMA will catch up in the coming years and KAMA has reconfirmed its commitment to do so.

The Community’s CO2 strategy is based on three main pillars: agreements with the automobile industry on fuel economy improvements; labelling of new passenger cars to ensure that information relating to fuel economy and CO2 emissions is made available to consumers, and the promotion of car fuel efficiency by fiscal measures.