General Dynamics awarded $59.9 million to improve Land Warrior

General Dynamics Decision Systems has been awarded a $59.9 million cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to enhance the current version of the US Army’s Land Warrior system.


General Dynamics Decision Systems, a business unit of General Dynamics, has been awarded a $59.9 million cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to enhance the current version of the US Army’s Land Warrior system.


Land Warrior was conceived in 1991 when a US Army study group recommended the service look at the soldier as a complete weapon system.


Consequently, Land Warrior sought to integrate small arms with high-tech equipment enabling ground forces to deploy, fight and win on the battlefields of the 21st century.


Based on recent advances in communications, sensors, and materials, the Land Warrior System integrates commercial, off-the-shelf technologies into a complete soldier system.


The current Land Warrior consists of several subsystems, including a weapon system, an integrated helmet assembly and protective clothing. Through a helmet-mounted display, a soldier can view computer-generated graphical data, digital maps, intelligence information, troop locations and imagery from a weapon-mounted thermal sight and video camera.


This capability is said to allow a soldier to see around corners, acquire a target, and then fire the weapon without risking exposure to enemy fire. Menu driven displays are controlled by the soldier from a pointing device located on the chest strap and operated by the touch of a finger.


‘Soldiers in the Army’s Objective Force will have a sophisticated level of functionality that not only protects them better, but also enables total integration into the advanced electronics that define the digital battlefield,’ said Mark A. Fried, president and general manager of General Dynamics Decision Systems.


The Land Warrior systems General Dynamics develops through this program will allow the soldier to pass and receive data not only with Stryker Brigade Combat Team vehicles but throughout the battlefield.


The systems will also be interoperable with the Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2) system, the command and control system at the heart of the Army’s digitisation efforts.


The Army has said that the initial Land Warrior system could be combat-ready as early as 2004. The first systems under the contract are scheduled for delivery to the program office, PEO Soldier, in 2005.



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