Directive beam shines in demo

Harris Corporation and BAE Systems have successfully demonstrated the first Highband Networking Radio system featuring directive beam technology, an approach that extends range, improves throughput, and enhances spectrum efficiency.


Harris Corporation and BAE Systems have successfully demonstrated the first Highband Networking Radio (HNR) system featuring directive beam technology, an approach that extends range, improves throughput, and enhances spectrum efficiency.



The Harris-BAE Systems team demonstrated a self-forming, self-healing, mobile network utilising the HNR co-developed by the two companies.



The demonstration was conducted on January 25 and 26 in a 500-square-kilometre area of Melbourne, Florida. Attendees included representatives from all branches of the US armed forces and from companies involved in large-system integration.



‘This demo has proven that true, ad-hoc mobile networking is now available,’ said Sheldon Fox, vice president and general manager of Department of Defense Programs, Harris Government Communications Systems Division. “HNR provides the unique capability of a high throughput, mesh network that can be used in both mobile and static operations.’



According to Harris, the demonstration highlighted the full range of the HNR system’s capabilities, including voice-over-IP, video teleconferencing, high-definition video and e-mail transmission at speeds of more than 30 megabits per second.



Using the Army’s Joint Network Nodes (JNNs) to simulate multiple battalion-level tactical operations centres linked back to a simulated command centre, the HNR demonstrated static and mobile backbone communications links for army units dispersed throughout a 500-square-kilometre urban environment.



In addition, mobile satellite communications, secure wireless local area network (LAN) communications and tactical voice communications were integrated into the network and linked to a General Dynamics facility in Taunton, Massachusetts, via a Ku-band satellite.