DTI boost for simulation technology

The Government is investing in a £17.4m project to provide computer technology to bring the next generation of aircraft into production in the UK and boost the UK’s car and boat industries.

The government is investing in a £17.4m project to provide computer technology to bring the next generation of aircraft into production in the UK and boost the UK‘s car and boat industries.

 

The project announced today will put £8.7m of government money, through the DTI-led Technology Programme, towards an Airbus-led consortium to develop computer-based simulation software to improve the design process for future aircraft.

 

The project, called the CFMS Core Programme, will radically cut the time between concept stage and a marketable product. It will speed up testing by using computer-based simulation.

 

By 2012 computer-based simulations will replace physical testing, meaning parts of the aircraft design process could be reduced to 36 days, instead of 350. The technology will also be used in the marine and automotive industries.

 

The programme will bring together research teams and projects that have wide application across many sectors of the UK‘s industrial base including medical research, vehicle design and motorsport, energy and environment services, and food and other process industries.

 

Systems engineering consultancy Frazer-Nash has announced that it will be playing a central role in the project, ensuring the cross-industry use of the simulation technology. It will also be the key driver for the marine industry, undertaking research and development to accelerate the design of high-performance marine craft.

 

The three-year CFMS Core Programme is part of the National Aerospace Technology Strategy (NATS) and has been match funded by industry, keen to position the UK as a world leader in advanced simulation technology.