Monitor goes to heart of problem

Heart patients at the Ohio State University Heart Centre are testing the Chronicle Implantable Hemodynamic Monitor, a monitor that transmits critical data from their heart over the telephone.

A group of patients in the US is testing an implantable monitor that transmits critical data from their heart over the telephone, eliminating travel to the doctor’s office for the same type of monitoring.

Proven successful, the experimental device could herald a major breakthrough for the growing number of people diagnosed with heart failure. Those living with heart failure could enjoy an improved lifestyle with less dependency on frequent doctor visits, and for cardiac researchers it might be the most advanced bellwether device yet for detecting heart problems at their earliest stages.

Within minutes of viewing the transmitted data from any location with computer access, the physician, if needed, can make adjustments to the patients’ medication or prescribe additional therapy.

‘I’ve been very impressed with the technology, and patients in the study seem to like it as well,’ said Dr. William Abraham, director of cardiology at the OSU Heart Centre and principal investigator of the study at Ohio State.

‘Instead of seeing a cardiologist about once every two to three weeks for follow-up care, patients with the monitor need an office appointment less than once a month,’ said Abraham.

The Chronicle Implantable Hemodynamic Monitor is implanted in the upper chest. A sensor attached to the monitor is threaded through a vein into the heart’s right ventricle, where it measures heart rate, heart temperature and blood pressure inside the heart.

Patients pass a magnetic ‘wand’ over their chest to send a signal to the device to transmit data to a doctor via a telephone hook-up. Some pacemakers use the same type of technology to relay data, but the information is limited mostly to the condition of the pacemaker and its battery.

‘With access to data from the implanted monitor around the clock, 365 days a year, we can be way out ahead of any serious heart problems that might develop,’ Abraham said. ‘If we do see something in the data that we can’t correct with an adjustment in medication or other adjunct therapy, we can ask the patient to come in for further testing.’

The device, made by Medtronic, has not been approved for general use. However, data accumulated by researchers at Ohio State and other test sites could lead to Food and Drug Administration approval of the device in the next two to three years. At least 50 people are being enrolled in the Ohio State arm of the study.