Damage limitation from Technion

Researchers at The Technion- Israel Institute of Technology have developed a non-invasive technology for monitoring respiration, especially in premature babies.


Researchers at the Technion- Israel Institute of Technology have developed a non-invasive technology for monitoring respiration, especially in premature babies.



The device, which is being clinically tested at the CarmelMedicalCenter in Haifa, uses sensors to monitor lung activity.



According to Technion, equipment in intensive care units does not monitor for respiratory problems and up to six hours can elapse from when a problem occurs in lung ventilation until medical staff detect it. This delay can cause irreversible damage to the body’s organs.



The device developed at the Faculty of Biomedical Engineering can detect respiratory irregularities in newborn babies at an early stage, reducing the risk of long-term damage to vital organs.



Early detection of respiratory problems, such as accumulation of air between the lungs and chest cavity walls, partial blockage of the air passages, or breathing from only one lung is prevented, reducing the risk of complications and irreversible brain damage.



The technology is currently being developed for clinical use by Israeli company Pneumedicare, headed by Technion academics Professor Amir Landesburg, Dr Dan Waisman and Dr Carmit Levy.



Dr Levy, director of Pneumedicare commented: ‘We directly monitor the mechanics of respiration by placing sensors on two sides of the chest and the upper part of the stomach of a premature baby on a respirator. Thus, we can monitor a lack of symmetry between the two lungs and the development of mechanical disturbances in lung ventilation.’