Mice and rats

Agilent has introduced a Multiple Affinity Removal Column for mouse serum, which it claims is the industry’s first to remove the three most highly abundant proteins in that serum.

Blood serum is a rich source of biological markers (biomarkers), which are proteins whose presence can indicate a disease or a potential response to therapy.

Biomarkers can be used for applications including early cancer detection, quick detection of heart attack, and early assessment of drug toxicity or efficacy. Three of the most common and high-abundant proteins in mouse blood serum, a commonly used research sample, obscure the identification of rare proteins that could serve as biomarkers.

To help researchers better analyse previously undetectable proteins for biomarkers, Agilent has introduced a Multiple Affinity Removal Column for mouse serum, which it claims is the industry’s first to remove the three most highly abundant proteins in that serum.

In August 2003, Agilent introduced the Multiple Affinity Removal Column for human serum, which has proven successful in rapid identification of low-abundant proteins and biomarkers in human blood serum.

The Human Proteome Organisation and its Plasma Proteome Initiative, after comparative tests of multiple technologies, have found there is a significant benefit in upfront depletion of high-abundant proteins. By first removing these proteins, researchers are better able to identify and study rarer proteins in blood that could serve as drug targets or biomarkers in the detection of disease.

The ability to identify biomarkers in mouse serum allows scientists to conduct studies that are not yet adaptable to humans and to compare the effects of a drug or external factor on similar human and mouse proteins.

Agilent’s Multiple Affinity Removal Column for mouse serum is a liquid chromatography (LC) column that uses immunoaffinity technology to specifically target and remove albumin, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and transferin – proteins that comprise approximately 80% of the total protein mass in mouse serum.

This capability helps researchers unmask the remaining, more rare, 20% of proteins that are potential biological markers, speeding disease and drug research. The column also works with rat serum.