Toyota and Shell launch green initiative

Toyota and Shell Gas & Power today launched a trial of Shell Gas to Liquids (GTL) Fuel in a fleet of Toyota Avensis cars equipped with D-CAT emission reduction technology.

Toyota and Shell Gas & Power today launched a trial of Shell Gas to Liquids (GTL) Fuel in a fleet of ten Toyota Avensis cars equipped with D-CAT emission reduction technology.

The so-called ‘Driving Tomorrow’s Clean Technology’ trial is part of a joint Toyota/Shell research programme that ultimately aims to demonstrate that low-emission GTL can be used in today’s diesel car engines, without any conversion or investment.

David Jamieson MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Transport, launched the trial at Shell Centre, in London. The event was hosted by Dr. Akihiko Saito, Executive Vice President, Toyota Motor Corporation and Malcolm Brinded, Group Managing Director, Royal Dutch/Shell Group of Companies.

According to Shell, GTL Fuel is colourless, odourless and virtually free of suphur and aromatics. It has a high cetane number (75-80) – a measure of fuel combustion quality – compared to refinery diesel (45-55) providing higher engine efficiency. Shell claims that it reduces local emissions (PM, NOx, CO, HC), either as a blend with diesel fuel, or 100% pure compared with refinery diesel fuel -even ultra low sulphur (50 ppm) diesel.

Toyota Diesel Clean Advanced Technology (D-CAT) is a technology simultaneously and continuously reducing both Particulate and NOX in diesel exhaust gas.

During the trial, the GTL fuelled cars were driven by the British Red Cross, Shelter, Guy’s and St Thomas’s Hospital Trust and the Energy Saving Trust in the London area. Over the next three months, these organisations will use the cars in fund-raising events and to provide help to those who are homeless or ill and may need hospital care.

“I am very pleased to see leading players in the oil and motor industries working together like this to find creative ways of reducing the impact of road transport on the environment,” said Transport Minister David Jamieson.

“Gas to liquids fuels offer a number of potential environmental benefits, which is particularly good news in a city like London,” added Jamieson. “And when used in cars which are already very clean, the end result is even better.”