Competition for creative assistance

Oxford Creativity, a UK TRIZ consultancy, has collaborated with Bath Institute of Medical Engineering to launch a nationwide problem solving competition.


Oxford Creativity, a UK TRIZ consultancy, has collaborated with Bath Institute of Medical Engineering (BIME) to launch a nationwide problem solving competition. The competition challenges inventors and innovators to find a solution to one of three assistive technology design problems. The winning entrants has a chance to see their designs manufactured and in use, and will also receive a free place on a TRIZ workshop or a half-day problem solving session with Oxford Creativity.



The three challenges involve finding a method to enable someone with weak legs to get from a sitting to a standing position, designing an alternative to compression stockings (or making them easier to use) and inventing a device to help people in intensive care to read books. These real life design challenges were identified and proposed for the competition by BIME, which designs and manufactures devices for the disabled.



Oxford Creativity says it uses TRIZ to enable companies and individuals to reach their creative potential. The company has worked with major UK engineering firms including BAE Systems, Airbus, Esso, Glaxo and Rolls Royce, where TRIZ is now considered a core competence tool. Oxford Creativity has devised this competition with the support of BIME, to encourage TRIZ-trained engineers to put their problem solving skills to the test.


Oxford Creativity Director, Karen Gadd said: “There is so much creative talent among our engineering community, and we wanted to find a way of harnessing that talent to help solve some of the mobility issues faced by thousands of people. BIME specialises in designing and manufacturing assistive technologies, making them the ideal partner for this project. The three challenges posed by the Institute offer the opportunity for TRIZ practitioners to design life-changing innovations. We hope that each problem will be solved, and I look forward to seeing the winning designs in use.”