Is this man the new Bill Gates?

Lindows gets a big boost this week with the announcement that Walmart stores in the US are now stocking PCs running the Lindows OS, starting at the outrageously low price of $299.

Michael Robertson’s new company Lindows gets a big boost this week with the announcement that Walmart stores in the US are now stocking PCs running his Lindows operating system, starting at the outrageously low price of $299.

But perhaps even more significantly, the company’s new Click-N-Run Warehouse is a new concept that radically changes the way that software is delivered to the consumer.

Click-N-Run Warehouse is an on-line store that is stocked with over 1,000 programs. A single payment of $99 gives users membership to the programs in the warehouse which they can then own permanently. All the LindowsOS computers from Walmart.com can be plugged into a DSL, cable modem or modem line and then – hey presto -instant access to the Warehouse.

Better yet, each computer comes with a trial account which allows for any 3 programs to be loaded from the Click-N-Run Warehouse to experience the technology.

There’s good news too for computer builders. Computer-makers, for the first time, can take advantage of a flat-fee licensing plan allowing them to bundle LindowsOS on as many machines as they want, doing away with the standard per-machine costs machine-builders have historically paid.

This approach to computer software bundling will make computers more affordable and help computer manufacturers become more profitable.

‘We spent a lot of time talking to literally hundreds of computer builders getting their input,’ said Michael Robertson, Chief Executive Officer of Lindows.com, Inc. ‘They told us they wanted a simple choice that wouldn’t require per-copy tracking, registration codes, and long-term commitments, all of which negatively impacts profits. The Lindows.com Builder program at $500 per month is a radical departure from the per-copy licensing program most computer builders are used to. This will be a huge savings for computer assemblers in both licensing and logistical costs which will ultimately make them more profitable and deliver savings to their customers as well.’

Is this man the new Bill Gates? Could be.

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