JV aims for eco-friendly Sorona

DuPont and Tate & Lyle today announced a joint venture to create products from renewable resources, such as corn, for applications including clothing, interiors, engineered polymers and textile fibres.

DuPont and Tate & Lyle today announced a joint venture to create products from renewable resources such as corn for numerous applications including clothing, interiors, engineered polymers and textile fibres.

The new company, DuPont Tate & Lyle BioProducts, is equally owned by DuPont and Tate & Lyle and will be based in Wilmington, Delaware. The company plans to construct its initial commercial manufacturing plant adjacent to an existing facility in Loudon, Tennessee, with start-up scheduled for 2006. A pilot facility in Decatur, Illinois has been operating for several years.

The joint venture will use a proprietary fermentation and purification process developed jointly by DuPont and Tate & Lyle to produce 1,3 propanediol (PDO), the key building block for DuPont Sorona polymer.

As DuPont’s newest polymer platform, Sorona is said to offer properties such as stain-resistance, softness, comfort stretch and recovery, and UV- and chlorine-resistance when compared to polyester and nylon. Sorona can be used in a variety of applications including textile apparel, interiors, engineering resins and packaging.

The new bio-based technology is said to use less energy and employs renewable resources, replacing the need for traditional petrochemicals now used to produce 1,3 propanediol (PDO).

“Sorona is an excellent example of putting science to work by integrating biology with materials science,” said John Ranieri, vice president and general manager – DuPont Bio-Based Materials. “Sorona combines the emerging discipline of metabolic engineering (the capability for biology to produce valuable products) with the leading polymer engineering capabilities of DuPont.”

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