The difference is in the nonlinearity

Analog Devices claims that its new AD9480 8-bit analog-to-digital converter has a differential nonlinearity twice as good as competitive ICs with comparable sample rates.

Analog Devices claims that its new AD9480 8-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) can achieve a conversion rate of 250 MSPS while maintaining a differential nonlinearity (DNL) of +/- 0.25 LSB – twice as good as competitive ICs with comparable sample rates.

The device is suited for applications that require high sample rates and high bandwidth, such as point-to-point backhaul radios and power amplifier (PA) digital pre-distortion subsystems in cellular base stations.

It offers legacy support for demultiplexed TTL/CMOS output logic, as well as LVDS (low-voltage differential signalling) outputs, to accommodate both existing and next-generation digital ASICs (application-specific integrated circuits).

In CMOS demultiplexed mode, the ADC moves data through two 8-bit channels at one-half the clock rate in either interleaved or parallel mode. When operating in LVDS mode, it pipes data at the full clock rate through a single output channel for maximum output performance.

In addition to easing design concerns through its support of LVDS outputs, the device achieves a 46.4 dB SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and no missing codes. It also guarantees +/-0.35 LSB DNL over the entire industrial temperature range of -40 degrees C to +85 degrees C.

The converter operates from a 3.3-V power supply and includes an internal reference and track-and-hold circuit.

Sampling now, the device comes in a 44-pin TQFP (thin quad flat pack). It is priced at $24.20 per unit in 1,000-piece quantities.

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