Improved bio-based polymer

Fujitsu Limited and Fujitsu Laboratories have announced the development of a new bio-based polymer that retains the heat resistance and mouldability of their previously developed bio-based polymer.


Fujitsu Limited and Fujitsu Laboratories have announced the development of a new bio-based polymer that retains the heat resistance and mouldability of their previously developed bio-based polymer, while improving impact resistance by 50%.



Fujitsu has succeeded in developing a prototype mobile phone chassis using the new bio-based polymer, and exhibited it this week at the Fujitsu Forum 2006.



In recent years, increases in carbon dioxide emissions caused by the use of fossil fuels have resulted in a rapid advance in global warming. This condition has raised interest in the use of bio-based polymers which have a lower environmental burden, as an alternative to conventional plastics made from petroleum, a limited natural resource.



In collaboration with Toray Industries, Fujitsu has developed a new bio-based polymer that features high impact resistance, by further refining the microstructure and improving the compatibility of polylactic acid, made from materials including corn, with polymer alloyed-polycarbonate, which has a high glass transition temperature (the phenomenon in which heated polymer transforms from a hard glass-like state to a rubbery state).



In June 2002, Fujitsu introduced the world’s first notebook PC in which certain parts of the chassis were made from a corn-based bio-based polymer. In January 2005, Fujitsu and Toray combined polymer-alloy technology and flame-retardance technology to develop a bio-based polymer with high heat-resistance, low flammability, and good mouldability, which Fujitsu introduced in the world’s first notebook PC with a full-size chassis made with bio-based polymer. In Fujitsu’s latest notebook model available in Japan, the FMV-BIBLO NB80S, 93% of the entire chassis is made from bio-based polymer.