Radiation detection gets flexible

Surrey University researchers have developed a flexible radiation detector which could work better over large areas than traditional tools for the job


Surrey University researchers have developed a flexible radiation detector which could work better over large areas than traditional types.



Most current radiation detectors are made from an inorganic semiconductor, such as silicon. As they are not flexible, this makes them difficult to use over large areas.



The Surrey team, led by Dr Paul Sellin, developed a detector using a plastic that conducts electricity. As the radiation dose increases, a greater current flows in the plastic detector, allowing an accurate measurement to be made.



The research effort has received a boost recently in the form of a one-year research grant from the Science and Technology Facilities Council. The grant is being shared with Centronic, a Croydon-based company that manufactures and develops radiation detectors.



Sellin and his collaborators in the Physics Department, Dr Alan Dalton and Dr Joe Keddie, have also filed a patent on organic radiation detectors with support from the university.



Sellin said: ‘This successful research has grown from a collaborative effort drawing on our expertise in radiation detection and the experience within the Soft Condensed Matter Physics Group in making polymer films and understanding their properties.’



Keddie added: ‘Within the Physics Department, the Radiation Laboratories and the Soft Matter Laboratories have benefited from recent investment from government SRIF funding. This investment is clearly leading to exciting scientific results combined with a patent and further funding.’