Driving the HVAC industry

Purchasers of drives in the HVAC market cited competitive price as the overriding factor involved in their purchasing decision, according to a new study from Frost and Sullivan.

Purchasers of drives in the HVAC market cited competitive price as the overriding factor involved in their purchasing decision, with more than 40% of respondents stating that this was the key issue for them, according to a new study from Frost and Sullivan.

However, when asked to evaluate price as well as a range of other factors, a different level of importance became apparent. Respondents rated quality as the most important issue, giving it a rating of 4.82 out of a maximum of 5. Competitive price was the third most important issue being rated at 4.36 out of 5, still above the general market average. Issues with lower priority included ease-of-use rated at just 3.73 out of 5 and technical support at 3.55 out of 5.

The majority of parties questioned during Frost and Sullivan’s survey agreed that Siemens has achieved the greatest penetration in the market with one in five respondents having purchased a drive from the company. This shows that Siemens has been focused on reaching a wider customer base and could act to support the company’s continued leadership in the field.

ABB also scored well with 17.6% of respondents having purchased a drive from that company. The third most important manufacturer in terms of supply was Danfoss with 16.9% of respondents stating that they had purchased a drive from the company.

Some of the other main suppliers, although with a smaller standing, include Control Techniques, Schneider, Mitsubishi and Alstom.

The study also revealed that HVAC sector enjoys the highest levels of customer satisfaction, with 91.2% of respondents stating that they were content with their supplier. Nevertheless, loyalty was lower with just over four in ten stating that they would not consider other suppliers in future.

Interestingly, the key decision-maker in the purchasing process was the purchasing department of a company rather than the engineering department.