10Gbps standards set

Five major IC companies have created the Unified 10Gbps Physical-Layer Initiative (UXPi) to advocate a common 10Gbps physical-layer standard across multiple markets.

Five major IC companies including Applied Micro Circuits Corporation, IBM, Infineon, Texas Instruments and Xilinx have created the Unified 10Gbps Physical-Layer Initiative (UXPi) to advocate a common 10Gbps physical-layer standard across multiple markets that aims to simplify and accelerate the implementation of next generation 10Gbps systems.

A common physical standard will allow developers to significantly reduce the costs and risks normally associated with developing next generation systems.

Today, standard bodies are defining 3.125Gbps and 5-6Gbps, and 10Gbps serial standards. As these bodies begin to solidify 10Gbps communication standards, the need for a unified, compatible physical layer is critical. The UXPi Group believes that a common standard will address challenges such as more severe attenuation and signal interference, which arise as 10Gbps digital signalling enters the RF domain. And just as important, will ensure interoperability across multiple markets and products.

UXPi is laying the groundwork for common 10Gbps standard by solidifying the physical/electrical layer of the 10Gbps chip-to-chip and backplane interface – participating in, supporting, and supplementing the efforts of standards bodies, which are often more focused on their respective markets and on defining the upper, logical/digital layers of the 10 Gbps standards.

The efforts of UXPi will enable standards bodies to focus on developing the protocols necessary to serve the unique needs of their respective markets, rather than focusing on the lower layers defining and testing a 10Gbps physical standard.

UXPi is organised as a program under the IEEE-ISTO, which provides a legal and administrative platform on which UXPi operations can progress.

UXPi plans to work with numerous companies to develop, refine and make the specification available.

On the web