Setting the standard for separated sensors

The IEEE Standards Association Standards Board has approved a new standard for interfacing multiple, physically separated transducers that allows for the time synchronisation of data.

The IEEE Standards Association Standards Board has approved IEEE 1451.3, the first independent standard for interfacing multiple, physically separated transducers that allows for the time synchronisation of data. It also approved the start of work on IEEE PC95.1b, an amendment to extend the standard for measuring radio frequency radiation in the human body to the outer ear.

The IEEE 1451.3 – Standard for a Smart Transducer Interface for Sensors and Actuators, Digital Communication and Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS) Formats for Distributed Multidrop Systems – defines a digital interface for connecting multiple transducers confined to a relatively small space, although not necessarily in the same enclosure.

The standard provides a minimum implementation for the multidrop, hot swapping, self-identification and configuration of transducers and avoids the need for costly and time-consuming custom solutions. It defines the TEDS format, electrical interface, channel identification protocols, hot swap protocols, time synchronization protocols, and the read-and-write logic functions used in accessing TEDS and transducer data.

The planned amendment, IEEE PC95.1b – Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz, Amendment 1: Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) Limits for the Pinna – will address the SAR in the outer ear.

This will extend SAR limits already defined for extremities, e.g., the hands, feet, wrist and ankles. The amendment will allow an appropriate head model to be finalised and a recommended practice to be completed for certifying that hand-held wireless devices meet existing SAR criteria.