Chewing gum comes unstuck

Chemicals company Revolymer, a Bristol University spinout, plans to launch its non-adhesive chewing gum ,Clean Gum, in 2008 following successful testing


Chemicals company Revolymer, a Bristol University spinout, plans to launch its non-adhesive chewing gum, Clean Gum, in 2008 following successful testing.



According to Revolymer, field tests showed that Clean Gum can be easily removed from shoes, clothes, pavements and hair while not compromising on taste and texture. Under the same conditions ordinary chewing gum is very difficult to remove.



The company has completed initial street trials on pavements as part of a collaborative agreement with local councils. In two town trials, leading commercial gums remained stuck to the pavements three out of four times. In all tests the Revolymer gum was removed within 24 hours by ‘natural events’.



‘Our initial research focused on the removability of our new Clean Gum from a variety of surfaces and we have shown that our technology has made a step change in chewing gum as a consumer product, said Prof Terence Cosgrove, chief scientific officer of Revolymer. ‘The advantage of our Clean Gum is that it has a great taste, it is easy to remove and in preliminary results is environmentally degradable.’



‘I am delighted with our progress. In 18 months we have converted UK technology into a commercial product, significantly changing the pollution issues facing chewing gum,’ said Roger Pettman, company chairman and CEO. ‘Removable, degradable chewing gum is becoming a reality.’



Revolymer’s research is carried out at Bristol University and development at its Technology Centre in Mostyn, Wales. The company focuses on developing new polymers with enhanced physical properties manufactured from existing commodity polymers.



Developed by Cosgrove during research at Bristol, Revolymer says the materials have many potential applications in drug delivery, medical devices, paints and coatings, textiles and personal care products.