No longer stumped

Thermal infrared camera technology called ‘Hot Spot’ could end all speculation surrounding a cricket dismissal by recording the tiny amounts of heat generated by impacts by the ball.


Thermal infrared camera technology called ‘Hot Spot’ could end all speculation surrounding a cricket dismissal by recording the tiny amounts of heat generated by the impact of the ball.



The system was developed by Cedip Infrared Systems, specialists in thermal IR camera technology, working with BBG Sports, of Melbourne, Australia. It was trialled at the recent first Ashes cricket test match between Australia and England in Brisbane, by broadcasters the Nine Network.



The ‘Hot Spot’ uses two Cedip Emerald IR cameras positioned above the field of play at opposite ends of the ground to record play and goes into action if there is an umpiring incident. The sensitive cameras are able to remotely sense and measure the miniscule amount of heat generated by a collision, such as ball on pad, ball on bat or ball on ground, enabling an exact decision to be made for a snick, bat-pad catch, or LBW appeal.



When an umpiring decision comes into play, the continuously recording cameras produce a black and white negative image which shows the ball’s precise point of contact.