Painless insulin injection

A lecturer at Technion University in Israel has developed a device that will enable diabetics to inject their insulin dosage simply and painlessly.

Dr. Shuki Yeshurun, a lecturer at Technion University in Israel, has developed a device that may revolutionise the lives of diabetics. The device, called NanoPump, will enable diabetics to inject their insulin dosage simply and painlessly.

The NanoPump, developed and commercialised by NanoPass, comprises a tiny silicon array in which dozens or hundreds of tiny, hollow pyramids, are set. Large molecules, such as insulin, are injected through the silicon array and into the upper layer of the skin by an insulin pump.

In addition to easing painful procedures for diabetics, the NanoPump can be used to deliver other drugs as well, such as those used for immunisation.

According to Dr. Yeshurun, injecting a drug into the upper layer of a patient’s skin may yield better results than deeper penetration. In the case of immunisations, for example, the new method can save large sums of money because shallow injection enables the use of smaller quantities of a vaccine than is required for conventional injections.

NanoPass has already signed development agreements with a number of pharmaceutical and medical device companies around the world.

Sales of the NanoPump are not, however, planned until 2005.