R-MC Power Recovery/Cranfield University

THIS PROJECT involves the Power and Propulsion Department of the School of
Engineering at Cranfield University and R-MC, a company based in Lincolnshire with just
six employees.
The main business of R-MC is performance recovery of gas turbines and othe

THIS PROJECT involves the Power and Propulsion Department of the School of Engineering at Cranfield University and R-MC, a company based in Lincolnshire with just six employees.

The main business of R-MC is performance recovery of gas turbines and other engines through cleaning of the compressor component. For gas turbine engines in particular, effective compressor cleaning can result in substantial engine fuel savings and valuable extensions to the life of hot gas components.

R-MC provides a service to the gas turbine user community that comprises design and manufacture of its equipment to enable the injection of an atomised cleaning fluid whilst the engine is stationary or running. In particular, the company has developed and produced a patented fluid, which is suitable for many different gas turbine applications in many parts of the world.

Cranfield’s Department of Power and Propulsion is active in research and postgraduate-only programmes focusing mainly on gas turbine engines. Given the common interest in gas turbines, R-MC started research at Cranfield with the objective of gaining a better understanding of the function and performance of the whole engine, with the objective of creating a competitive edge. In 2001, two doctoral candidates began work on agreed collaborative projects with RMC. A relationship that began as a joint venture in research has now developed into an integrated scheme that encompasses analytical work with CFD, experimental research, marketing, contributions to teaching programmes and mutual staff training. The technical study programme has given R-MC a much-improved insight into the physical phenomena at the centre of its core business. For example, the outcome of one of the doctoral study programmes gave it a better view of how to angle the spray injection nozzles to achieve best performance recovery from fouled compressors. The collaborative research programme has already produced six authoritative publications. In addition, two doctoral theses and six masters/special project theses have been successfully completed.

For more information visit www.r-mc.com