Scrambling radar-guided missiles

BAE Systems is developing a high-power amplifier technology to protect soldiers against radar-guided missile threats as part of an $8m US Army contract


BAE Systems is developing a high-power amplifier technology to protect soldiers against radar-guided missile threats as part of an $8m US Army contract.



Under the contract from US Army Communications-Electronics Command as part of the Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA) Disruptive Manufacturing Technology programme, BAE Systems will build a 160-watt solid-state, gallium nitride (GaN) power amplifier for communications, electronic warfare and radar applications.



The new technology will replace vacuum tubes, called travelling wave tubes, which are used to produce high-power radio frequency signals. The amplifiers will be capable of disrupting enemy communications and radar signals while protecting friendly communications.



‘Using this technology, we can develop systems that are significantly less expensive, more reliable, and lower in weight,’ said Tony Immorlica, programme manager of microwave device programs at BAE Systems.



Rohm and Haas of Blacksburg, Virginia and the University of Coloradowill also collaborate with BAE Systems on the programme.