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603B data sheet - .PDF file.

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5015 data sheet - .PDF file.

The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) is working on a dynamic pressure sensor calibration method based on shock tube techniques that NPL hopes will be adopted as an ISO standard. The Type 603B miniature piezoelectric pressure sensor and the Type 5015 single-channel laboratory charge amplifier from Kistler Instruments were used to validate shock tube performance.

Methods and standards for static pressure calibration are well established, but no accepted method or standard exists for dynamic pressure calibration. There is growing demand within industry to ensure pressure sensors faithfully record the changes in pressure that occur during combustion or explosion events. This demand is coupled with the quality imperative within industry.

NPL’s methodology uses a shock tube, in which a bursting disc separates two sections, and an increasing pressure in one section initiates failure of the disc, creating a pressure shock wave in the other section. This shock wave is used to calibrate the sensor under test mounted in the section’s end wall.

The majority of pressure sensors used in industrial applications to make dynamic measurements are calibrated only for static measurements, even though it is widely recognised that the behaviour of sensors will deviate progressively from their static characteristics as the frequency is increased. The new facility provides a calibration process that extends the measurement traceability of pressure sensors into the dynamic regime by exposing them to extremely fast pressure steps of up to 1.4MPa. This facility is particularly suitable for characterising sensors used in applications such as gas turbine and internal combustion engine development.

The pressure steps are created in a shock tube using different combinations of gas, bursting disc thickness and initial static pressure in the downstream section. The theoretical rise time for the pressure steps is in the region of a few nanoseconds making the frequency content of the pressure rise sufficient for practically all industrial applications. The calibration process extends the measurement traceability of the sensor into the dynamic regime by quantifying its resonant frequency and its amplitude and phase response over a wide range of frequencies. The SI traceability of the calibration is derived from the starting pressure and temperature, gas species and shock wave velocity measurements. In addition to the standard tests, NPL is able to investigate the dynamic characteristics of entire measurement systems.

Click on the links above to download the data sheets for the Type 603B and Type 5015 from Kistler Instruments.

Key benefits

  • The Type 603B features acceleration compensation and is designed specifically for measuring pressure fluctuations of high frequency and short rise time.
  • The Type 5015 single-channel laboratory charge amplifier has a wide measuring change.

Kistler Instruments

Established in Winterthur (Switzerland) in 1957, the Kistler Group now has a worldwide presence with 23 group companies and 30 distributors ensuring prompt, local application support and short delivery times. With a staff of more than 1,000, the Kistler Group is one of the world’s leading providers of dynamic measuring instrumentation.

Kistler’s core competence is the development, production and use of sensors for measuring pressure, force and acceleration.  Kistler’s know-how and electronic systems can be used to prepare measuring signals for use in analyzing physical processes, controlling and optimizing industrial processes, improving product quality in manufacturing and improving performance in sports and rehabilitation.

Kistler offers a comprehensive range of sensors and systems for engine development, automotive engineering, plastics and metal processing, installation technology and biomechanics.

Heavy investment in research and development, 15% of staff worldwide are engaged in research and development, has generated a number of innovations using piezoelectric, piezoresistive and capacitive techniques to provide solutions to numerous force, pressure and acceleration measuring problems. These innovations include the world’s first commercial quartz sensor, two-wire constant current technology to integrate sensors with microelectronic circuitry, high-temperature pressure sensors for use up to 400 Deg C and three-component force measuring sensors.

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