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Physik Instrumente (PI) has introduced the accurate, single-channel E-709 piezo controller and linear drive, suitable for piezo-based nanopositioning systems and scanners that use strain sensors.

Since the majority of the nanopositioning systems from PI employ such sensors, the E-709 allows lower system costs in comparison to digital controllers previously offered.

The controller works with linearisation algorithms which improve the positioning accuracy of the piezo system to below 0.01 per cent.

When supplying commands using the digital SPI, USP and RS-232 interfaces, the digital technology allows the setting of motion and control parameters and the programming of digital I/Os or the analogue exit via software.

Its amplifier provides 5W output power (10W for

Systems that fulfill these requirements include the P-620 PIHera linear stage and the P-721 and P-725 objective scanners of the PIFOC series.

One new feature is the serial SPI interface with up to 25MBit/s, with which it is possible to supply the commands for the voltage or position value for each control cycle as the controller is supplied with commands in real time.

The data format can be chosen using parameters: Floating-point values or fixed-point values with a variable bit width.

As is usual for PI, not only are the PIMikroMove and NanoCapture user software supplied, but also LabVIEW drivers and DLLs for programming with Windows or LINUX.

Many of PI’s positioning systems are now equipped with capacitive sensors, which measure the position of the moving platform without contact and directly, so that it is possible for parallel kinematic systems to measure in a number of degrees of freedom at the same time.

The E-609 controller board uses a digital controller, which achieves better linearisation values than completely analogue units and can be optimised using software and the USB service interface.

PI’s versatile, scalable piezo-based linear drive has drive forces up to 10N, velocities up to 0.5m/s and travel ranges of several tens of 10mm.

A piezo-ceramic actuator oscillating with ultrasonic frequencies is pre-loaded against a rod with linear guidance.

The oscillation profile of the actuator then produces the forward and backward motion of the drive.

The ceramic is preloaded against the rod, keeping it in its rest position when powered down.

Unlike electromagnetic linear motors, the piezo-based drive does not require any energy for this, meaning no heat is dissipated and the position is maintained with a high degree of stability.

During positioning operations, the piezo-based linear drive with optical linear encoder achieves an accuracy of around 10um.

Moreover, in contrast to electromagnetic linear drives, the piezo-ceramic actuator does not generate any interfering magnetic fields when in operation.

The piezo-based linear drive has a matching controller with pre-integrated driver electronics to generate the ultrasonic oscillations; both controller and linear drive are designed for industrial applications.

This creates a cost-effective linear drive system that is easy to integrate into the application.

The controller has a 100mm wide and 160mm long eurocard that can be controlled via an RS232 interface, CAN or an analog input, as desired, for velocity control or external operation via joystick, for example.

The 32-pole multipoint connector can be connected up by means of adapter modules or screw terminals when the control cabinet is being installed.

Piezo-based controller and linear drive

Physik Instrumente (PI) has introduced the accurate, single-channel E-709 piezo controller and linear drive, suitable for piezo-based nanopositioning systems and scanners that use strain sensors.

Since the majority of the nanopositioning systems from PI employ such sensors, the E-709 allows lower system costs in comparison to digital controllers previously offered.

The controller works with linearisation algorithms which improve the positioning accuracy of the piezo system to below 0.01 per cent.

When supplying commands using the digital SPI, USP and RS-232 interfaces, the digital technology allows the setting of motion and control parameters and the programming of digital I/Os or the analogue exit via software.

Its amplifier provides 5W output power (10W for

Systems that fulfill these requirements include the P-620 PIHera linear stage and the P-721 and P-725 objective scanners of the PIFOC series.

One new feature is the serial SPI interface with up to 25MBit/s, with which it is possible to supply the commands for the voltage or position value for each control cycle as the controller is supplied with commands in real time.

The data format can be chosen using parameters: Floating-point values or fixed-point values with a variable bit width.

As is usual for PI, not only are the PIMikroMove and NanoCapture user software supplied, but also LabVIEW drivers and DLLs for programming with Windows or LINUX.

Many of PI’s positioning systems are now equipped with capacitive sensors, which measure the position of the moving platform without contact and directly, so that it is possible for parallel kinematic systems to measure in a number of degrees of freedom at the same time.

The E-609 controller board uses a digital controller, which achieves better linearisation values than completely analogue units and can be optimised using software and the USB service interface.

PI’s versatile, scalable piezo-based linear drive has drive forces up to 10N, velocities up to 0.5m/s and travel ranges of several tens of 10mm.

A piezo-ceramic actuator oscillating with ultrasonic frequencies is pre-loaded against a rod with linear guidance.

The oscillation profile of the actuator then produces the forward and backward motion of the drive.

The ceramic is preloaded against the rod, keeping it in its rest position when powered down.

Unlike electromagnetic linear motors, the piezo-based drive does not require any energy for this, meaning no heat is dissipated and the position is maintained with a high degree of stability.

During positioning operations, the piezo-based linear drive with optical linear encoder achieves an accuracy of around 10um.

Moreover, in contrast to electromagnetic linear drives, the piezo-ceramic actuator does not generate any interfering magnetic fields when in operation.

The piezo-based linear drive has a matching controller with pre-integrated driver electronics to generate the ultrasonic oscillations; both controller and linear drive are designed for industrial applications.

This creates a cost-effective linear drive system that is easy to integrate into the application.

The controller has a 100mm wide and 160mm long eurocard that can be controlled via an RS232 interface, CAN or an analog input, as desired, for velocity control or external operation via joystick, for example.

The 32-pole multipoint connector can be connected up by means of adapter modules or screw terminals when the control cabinet is being installed.

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