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Heareus’ deuterium lamps are used as light sources in high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) for water and soil analysis to identify and quantify pesticides and other organic compounds in water.

The company’s UV technology is helping to enable sustainable and environmentally friendly analysis and disinfection of drinking water in cities such as New York.

In highly sensitive HPLC analyses, deuterium lamps such as Heraeus’ Fiberlight provide the light source and help render undesirable impurities visible even in trace amounts.

They emit a continuous spectrum of light ranging from UV wavelengths to the visible spectral range.

This makes them a suitable light source for high-precision absorption measurements in laboratory analysis, as well as for use with portable spectrometers in the field.

Even in New York City, treating drinking water with high-energy ultraviolet radiation is an established, environmentally friendly method of disinfecting water.

In comparison to chlorination, water-treatment processes with UV technology are chemical-free and can help sustainably ensure the quality of the drinking water.

A new water treatment plant set to soon supply New York City with drinking water has already been equipped with several thousand UV lamps from Heraeus, thereby securing clean water for the city’s more than nine million inhabitants.

According to Heraeus, water treatment is facing new challenges stemming from the increasing environmental pollution caused by medications, hormones, pesticides and herbicides in ground and surface water.

A combination of UV radiation and strong oxidising agents such as hydrogen peroxide has proven effective in rendering these complex molecules harmless.

Heraeus has developed ultraviolet emitters for this purpose.

For treating water polluted with pharmaceuticals, UV radiation isn’t enough and instead a technique called advanced oxidation is required.

Unlike water disinfection, this process uses UV radiation in the range below 250nm.

The high-energy light breaks down substances in the water that are not easily biodegradable or not biodegradable at all, decomposes chemical compounds and renders them ineffective.

Ultraviolet emitters disinfect drinking water

Heareus’ deuterium lamps are used as light sources in high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) for water and soil analysis to identify and quantify pesticides and other organic compounds in water.

The company’s UV technology is helping to enable sustainable and environmentally friendly analysis and disinfection of drinking water in cities such as New York.

In highly sensitive HPLC analyses, deuterium lamps such as Heraeus’ Fiberlight provide the light source and help render undesirable impurities visible even in trace amounts.

They emit a continuous spectrum of light ranging from UV wavelengths to the visible spectral range.

This makes them a suitable light source for high-precision absorption measurements in laboratory analysis, as well as for use with portable spectrometers in the field.

Even in New York City, treating drinking water with high-energy ultraviolet radiation is an established, environmentally friendly method of disinfecting water.

In comparison to chlorination, water-treatment processes with UV technology are chemical-free and can help sustainably ensure the quality of the drinking water.

A new water treatment plant set to soon supply New York City with drinking water has already been equipped with several thousand UV lamps from Heraeus, thereby securing clean water for the city’s more than nine million inhabitants.

According to Heraeus, water treatment is facing new challenges stemming from the increasing environmental pollution caused by medications, hormones, pesticides and herbicides in ground and surface water.

A combination of UV radiation and strong oxidising agents such as hydrogen peroxide has proven effective in rendering these complex molecules harmless.

Heraeus has developed ultraviolet emitters for this purpose.

For treating water polluted with pharmaceuticals, UV radiation isn’t enough and instead a technique called advanced oxidation is required.

Unlike water disinfection, this process uses UV radiation in the range below 250nm.

The high-energy light breaks down substances in the water that are not easily biodegradable or not biodegradable at all, decomposes chemical compounds and renders them ineffective.

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